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Sites about Voyages Extraordinaires

by Jules Verne

Critical sites about Voyages Extraordinaires

The Extraordinary Libraries of Jules Verne
http://JV.Gilead.org.il/evans/library.esp.html
"The motif of the library in Jules Verne's massive opus of the Voyages extraordinaires is both pervasive and richly polyvalent. Not only does it tie together a wide range of thematic, ideological, and narratological features shared by the 60-odd novels in this series, but it also serves to highlight the fundamentally oxymoronic character of the “roman scientifique” itself. Because of its essentially dualistic function in Verne's narratives, I shall discuss the role of the library--both real and imaginary--in these works in two phases: first as a tangible locus of the intended didacticism of the Vernian text, and second as a purely novelistic device used to enhance the fictional (as opposed to the scientific) verisimilitude therein."
Contains: Content Analysis
Author: Arthur B. Evans
From: L'Esprit Créateur Vol. 28 no. 1; p. 75-86; Spring 1988
Keywords:
 
The Illustrators of Jules Verne's Voyages Extraordinaires
http://JV.Gilead.org.il/evans/illustr/
"There appear to be four different categories of illustrations in the Voyages Extraordinaires, each of which has a different semiotic and/or didactic function within the narrative."
Contains: Content Analysis
Author: Arthur B. Evans
From: Science-Fiction Studies Vol. 25 no. 2; p. 241-70; July 1998
Keywords:
 
Literary Intertexts in Jules Verne's Voyages Extraordinaires
http://JV.Gilead.org.il/evans/literary.html
"A much less-discussed aspect of Verne's oeuvre (perhaps because of its pervasiveness) is his repeated allusions to well-known literary figures and their works -- allusions which function so as to firmly anchor his narratives to a recognizable cultural tradition, and thereby broaden Verne's own literary authoritativeness by identifying his novels more closely with those of the canonical literature(s) of his time."
Contains: Content Analysis
Author: Arthur B. Evans
From: Science-Fiction Studies Vol. 23 no. 2; p. 171-187; July 1996
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Optograms and Fiction: Photo in a Dead Man's Eye
http://JV.Gilead.org.il/evans/optogram.html
"One of Jules Verne's later Voyages Extraordinaires titled Les Frères Kip (The Kip Brothers, 1902) features in its conclusion a somewhat curious scientific concept—yet one which was quite popular during the latter half of the nineteenth century and the early years of the twentieth: the notion that the image of the last thing seen at the moment of death remains imprinted upon the retina of the eye."
Contains: Content Analysis, Historical Context
Author: Arthur B. Evans
From: Science-Fiction Studies Vol. 20 no. 3; p. 341-61; Nov. 1993
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The Vehicular Utopias of Jules Verne
http://JV.Gilead.org.il/evans/Verne_s_Vehicular_Utopias.html
"These idealized, hyperbolic vehicles found their expression in the many dream machines of Jules Verne's Voyages Extraordinaires—machines which might be called 'vehicular utopias' to the extent that they satisfied such 19th century visions of transportational perfection. In fact, to my mind, they might even be viewed as Verne's most fully realized utopias, in contrast to those most frequently cited by Vernian scholars: i.e., the static, antiseptic village of Franceville portrayed in Les Cinq cents millions de la Bégum [500 Million of the Begum] or Cyrus Smith's doomed castaway colony of L'Ile mystérieuse [Mysterious Island]. Verne's real utopias are vehicular: those memorable hot-air balloons, moon capsules, helicopter airships, submarines, trains, gypsy wagons, steam-powered RV's, and even propeller-driven mobile islands—all of which play such a central role in the Voyages Extraordinaires, transporting the heroes to the far ends of the Earth, to the bottom of the oceans, into the skies and beyond. Only they accurately embody the new utopian values (and, as we shall see, the ideological undertones) of the 19th-century Industrial Age imagination."
Contains: Content Analysis
Author: Arthur B. Evans
From: Transformations of Utopia: Changing Views of the Perfect Society New York: AMS Press, 1999: 99-108
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Last Updated Mar 25, 2014